Causes of posterior vitreous detachment

The vitreous is best described as the gel-like substance that is connected to the retina at various points on the rear of the eye. In case the vitreous becomes disconnected from the retina, there are various outcomes such as no effect at all, appearance of floaters or flashing lights or even lead to a retinal tear or detachment that entails immediate emergency care. By enrolling in an emergency course, you can learn the appropriate measures to perform if an individual has this condition. There are various factors that can cause posterior vitreous detachment such as surgical procedures and the aging process that you should be familiar with.

Trauma

Any trauma to the eye can also cause posterior vitreous detachment. If the eye sustained a direct blow, it can lead to traction on the vitreous and pull it away from the retina. Always bear in mind that trauma is a primary factor in cases of detachments that occur among individuals younger than 40 years old. If the individual is involved in a vehicular accident, there is a possibility that he/she has posterior vitreous detachment.

Posterior vitreous detachment

Any trauma to the eye can also cause posterior vitreous detachment. If the eye sustained a direct blow, it can lead to traction on the vitreous and pull it away from the retina.

Age

As an individual gets older, the gel-like material in the vitreous will start to liquefy in the middle part. In no time, the vitreous will eventually collapse in, pulling the vitreous from its attachment to the retina or at the optic nerve. The cases of posterior vitreous detachments are uncommon among individuals below the age of 50 years old but can occur more among individuals who are 70 years old or older. Understandably, age is a contributing factor to the occurrence of this eye condition.

Nearsightedness

Since the eyes of individuals who are nearsighted or myopic are longer than the normal eye, they are at risk for developing posterior vitreous detachment. In studies conducted, it was discovered that posterior vitreous detachment are linked with nearsightedness.

Inflammation or infection

If an infection develops in the back part of the eye, it can lead to inflammation. It is important to note that this inflammation can cause the vitreous to liquefy as well, thus leading to the collapse of the gel in the vitreous that will eventually pull away from the retina of the eye. Certain conditions such as uveitis which is an inflammation of the vitreous can eventually lead to posterior vitreous detachment over time.

Surgery

Individuals who have undergone cataract surgery face a higher risk of developing posterior vitreous detachment. Those who had a specific type of laser surgery such as a YAG laser after a cataract surgery also face a higher risk for posterior vitreous detachment.

If you suspect that an individual has posterior vitreous detachment, it is important to consult a doctor as soon as possible so that the appropriate treatment can be started right away.

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