Close look on a deep heel bruise

A deep heel bruise occurs from the deterioration of the microscopic calcium fibers. These fibers are essentially interlinked to allow the formation of bones. If a region of the fibers is impaired, a deep heel bruise forms.

The injury develops once the outermost layer of the heel bone endures miniature breaks. Take note that these breaks occur if the heel is subjected to trauma or repeated and strong impacts, usually from strenuous sports or strength training regimens.

What are the indications?

deep-heel-bruise

The primary signs include localized heel pain, usually moderate to intense pain that can last for several weeks or months.

The primary signs include localized heel pain, usually moderate to intense pain that can last for several weeks or months.

The discomfort might make it hard for the individual to walk or engage in daily tasks. The swelling and inflammation are also linked with a deep heel bruise. Occasionally, the small buildup of blood forms under the skin encasing the heel and results to swelling. Additionally, skin discoloration might arise after the injury. The bruise has a purplish-blue appearance due to the blood that accumulated under the skin.

What are the risk factors?

It is important to note that heel pain is one of the usual issues with a deep heel bruise. Remember that the heel takes in most of the strain from physical activities whether from running or impact when landing on the feet during a jumping motion.

Middle-aged individuals, those who engage in strenuous exercise and sports and obese are susceptible to end up with a deep heel bruise. In addition, children between 8-12 years are also at risk once they start to play sports at school.

Management for a deep heel bruise

The treatment for the discomfort caused by a deep heel bruise includes pain medications such as ibuprofen, adequate rest, elevation, application of ice packs and wrapping the affected heel using a stretch bandage.

Full recovery can be achieved within 1-2 weeks if the injury is not aggravated by strenuous physical activity. Only a few cases require surgical intervention to fix the heel. The healing can be promoted by rolling a small-sized frozen can beneath the foot to relieve the pain.

During the recovery phase, the individual must wear shoes that comfortably conform to the foot shape. The soles should be shock-absorbent with supportive sides and heels that are not worn out.

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